Last edited by Tezuru
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library. found in the catalog.

enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library.

M. S. Nomani

enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library.

by M. S. Nomani

  • 84 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published in Madras .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20379567M

There are a few different “destructions” of the library, but the main culprit is (inadvertently) Julius Caesar. Caesar The legendary library — the unmatched collection of books assembled by the early Ptolemies, estimated at between ,00 to ,0. Evidence for the existence of the Library after Caesar. As noted above, it is generally accepted that the Museum of Alexandria existed until c. AD , and if the Museum and the Library are considered to be largely identical or attached to one another, earlier accounts of destruction could only concern a small number of books stored is consistent with the number .

John M. Robertson, a historian of rationalistic and free thought, also dismissed the story of the destruction of the Alexandrian library by Umar as a myth.8 Historian DP Singhal considers the story untenable.9 Singhal writes, "It makes its first appearance in the solitary report of a stranger, Abul Faraj, who wrote years later. the first one wh o refuted these claim s in his book ‘ An Enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexanderian library ’ (Nomani & Sayeed, ). The refutation was then endorsed by a Author: Muhammad Nabeel Musharraf.

  The life and fate of the ancient Library of Alexandria Paris: UNESCO, p. p. See in particular, p , on the mingling of Greek, Roman, Perisan and Arabic materials, as well as a close examination of the historical sources discussing the collection's eventual dispersal and destruction.   Indeed, the Alexandria Library was much more. It “stimulated an intensive editorial program that spawned the development of critical editions, textual exegesis and such basic research tools as dictionaries, concordances and encyclopedias.” 11 The library in fact developed into a huge research institution comparable to a modern university—containing a center for .


Share this book
You might also like
Willard Stone

Willard Stone

Soviet anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism

Soviet anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism

The change your life book

The change your life book

Better Homes and Gardens Creating Style (Pleasure of Gardening)

Better Homes and Gardens Creating Style (Pleasure of Gardening)

Isabella

Isabella

Down the sky

Down the sky

Person centred purchasing

Person centred purchasing

2000 Import and Export Market for Glycosides, Glands, and Extracts in Cameroon

2000 Import and Export Market for Glycosides, Glands, and Extracts in Cameroon

Essentials of Texas water resources

Essentials of Texas water resources

Poster Prices VII

Poster Prices VII

Types of modern theology

Types of modern theology

Reach Out Book 1

Reach Out Book 1

Enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library by M. S. Nomani Download PDF EPUB FB2

Internet Archive BookReader An enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library Internet Archive BookReader An enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library An enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexandrian Library. Library of Alexandria, the most famous library of Classical antiquity.

It formed part of the research institute at Alexandria in Egypt that is known as the Alexandrian Museum. The library was named after Alexander the Great, who initiated the collection of documents in BCE.

Source: An Enquiry Into The Destruction Of The Ancient Alexandrian Library [Translator Muhammad Ghouse Sayeed – Vest And Company, Mount Road, Hyderabad, Deccan, ], by Moulvi Shibli Nomani (professor of Arabic, M.

College, Aligarth.), page 1 – 48) Don’t forget to follow Discover The Truth on Facebook and Twitter. The Library was one of the largest and most significant libraries of the ancient world, but details about it are a mixture of history and legend.

The earliest known surviving source of information on the founding of the Library of Alexandria is the pseudepigraphic Letter of Aristeas, which was composed between c. and c. The Letter of Aristeas claims that the Library was Country: Ptolemaic Kingdom.

What the Great Library Was. Most modern accounts say that the Great Library of Alexandria was founded at the beginning of the third century BC when Demetrios of Phaleron, a former student of Theophrastos who in turn was the student and successor of Aristotle, went into exile in the fledgling city of Alexandria and proposed a plan for the Library to Ptolemy I Soter.

The destruction of the great library of Alexandria has been lamented as one of the biggest losses of the ancient world. Nearly one million documents from across Assyria, Greece, Persia, Egypt, India and many other powerful civilizations at the time graced its : Dhwty.

Maualana Shibli Nomani is considered to be the first one who refuted these claims in his book 'An Enquiry into the destruction of the ancient Alexanderian library' (Nomani & Sayeed, ).

The refutation was then endorsed by a number of orientalist scholars in 20 th century. A clear answer to orientalists claims. Visit Australian Islamic Library for more. (English translation of the book 'Kutub Khana Iskandria'). "The Library of Alexandria" does a great job of explaining the scientific breakthroughs of individual ancient scholars.

This perspective adds to the usual tales of emperors and conquerors that so dominate the study of ancient history. What keeps me from giving this book five stars are the mundane illustrations that acccompany the book/5(10).

The library was so large it actually had another branch or "daughter" library at the Temple of Serapis. The first person blamed for the destruction of the Library is none other than Julius Caesar himself. In 48 BC, Caesar was pursuing Pompey into Egypt when he was suddenly cut off by an Egyptian fleet at Alexandria.

The Library of Alexandria was one of the greatest cultural adornments of the late ancient world, containing thousands of scrolls of Greek, Hebrew and Mesopotamian literature and art and artefacts of ancient Egypt.

This book demonstrates that Alexandria became - through the contemporary reputation of its library - a point of confluence for Greek Cited by: 3 The destruction of the library. I hope that, after reading the extract from Bagnall, you will have seen that asking ‘how we know what we know’ about the library of Alexandria means acknowledging that we actually know very uncertainty only deepens when we turn to consider its eventual fate.

Between and AD, the city of Alexandria saw a rebellion and an imperial counterattack that probably destroyed whatever remained of the Library, if.

An artist’s imagination of the Library of Alexandria. Roger Pearse, an English scholar and blogger on Late Antiquity and Patristics, has published a translation into English of the account of the Muslim historian al-Qifti on the destruction of the Library of translation was made by a French scholar, Emily Cottrell, and she based it on Julius Lippert’s.

The most celebrated library of the ancient world was established in Alexandria, Egypt, in the first half of the third century BC, during the reigns of Ptolemy I Soter and Ptolemy II Philadelphus, king of Egypt BC.

The library was part o a museum, which included a garden, a common dining room. Tradition's Destruction: On the Library of Alexandria Alexandrian inventions, the Ptolemaic MouoEiov, "shrine of the Muses," or "Museum," which constituted the largest center of learning in the ancient world.

Among classical sources there exist two accounts of the foundation of the Ptolemaic Museum. El-Abbadi, The Life and Fate of the Ancient Library of Alexandria (Paris, ); Rudolf Blum, Kallimachos, the Alexandrian Library and the Origins of Bibliography, tr.

Wellisch (Madison, ); Lionel Casson, Libraries in the Ancient World (New Haven, ); Diana Delia, "From Romance to Rhetoric: The Alexandrian Library in Classical andFile Size: 1MB. Read Online ( M) Free Islamic Books & Resources ([email protected]) Menu.

Mostafa A. El-Abbadi is a Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies at the University of Alexandria, Egypt, Special Advisor to the Director of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, and President of the Archaeological Society of Alexandria. He is the author of several books and articles, including Life and Fate of the Ancient Library of Alexandria (Paris, ), which was translated into several.

Yet while we know of many rumors of the destruction of "The Library" (in fact, there were at least three different libraries coexisting in the city), and know of whole schools of Alexandrian scholars and scholarship, there is scant data about the whereabouts, layout, holdings, organization, administration, and physical structure of the place.

This article needs attention from an expert in Ancient Egypt or Philosophy/ specific problem is: An expert is needed to fairly weigh the ancient sources, and to describe the consensus of modern scholarship, regarding the library's destruction.

WikiProject Ancient Egypt or WikiProject Philosophy/Ancient (or their Portals) may be able to help recruit an expert. -- Greek passerby, witnessing the destruction of the Library in A.D.

The destruction of the Library of Alexandria, as portrayed by the film "Agora" and the documentary "Hypatia and Alexandria.The elegiac regard for the loss of books in general and of the Alexandrian library in particular extends to postmodern writing.

Umberto Eco, Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Tom Stoppard, and Christine Brooke-Rose exemplify the new direction. Pathos rather than pleasure governs their descriptions of book destruction.

Borges is a case in point.